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Posts for category: Foot Condition

By David T. Magnesen, DPM
March 06, 2019
Category: Foot Condition
Is heel pain keeping you down? Pain that occurs following an injury or early in an illness may play a protective role, warning us about the damage we have suffered. SoYour Heel Pain Could Be Plantar Fasciitis what causes heel pain?
 
Plantar fasciitis is a foot condition in which a band of tissue in the sole of the foot becomes inflamed, leading to severe heel pain. The pain can be so bad that it hurts to walk, much less exercise or perform daily activities. If one step causes shooting pain in your heel—especially when you first get out of bed in the morning or stand up after sitting for a long period of time—plantar fasciitis may be to blame. Contact your podiatrist immediately for proper diagnosis and treatment of your pain. 
 

Understanding Heel Pain with Help from Your Podiatrist

Plantar fasciitis, or heel pain, occurs when the plantar fascia is strained over time beyond its normal extension. This causes the soft tissue fibers of the fascia to tear or stretch at points along its length, leading to inflammation, pain and possibly the growth of a bone spur where it attaches to the heel bone.
 
Inflammation may become irritated by shoes that lack appropriate support, mainly in the arch area and by the constant irritation associated with an athletic lifestyle. Resting may provide temporary relief, but when you resume walking you may experience a sudden elongation of the fascia band, which stretches and pulls on the heel. As you walk the pain may lessen or even disappear, but that may just be a false sense of relief, as the pain will often return after prolonged rest or extensive walking.  
 
You can take steps now to avoid heel pain, including:
  • Wear shoes that fit well
  • Wear proper shoes for each activity
  • Do not wear shoes with excessive wear on heels or soles
  • Prepare properly before exercising by stretching and warming up
  • Pace yourself when you participate in athletic activities
  • Don’t underestimate your body’s need for rest and good nutrition
  • Lose excess weight
If pain and other symptoms of inflammation persist, you should limit your normal daily activities and contact your podiatrist immediately.  
By David T. Magnesen, DPM
February 20, 2019
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Corns  

Many people think corns and calluses are the same thing, but there are differences. A corn is smaller than a callus, and has a hard center which is surrounded by inflamed tissue. Unlike calluses, corns can be painful and make it difficult to wear shoes. The good news is, your podiatrist can help get rid of corns and get you back on your feet.

Corns typically develop to protect your feet and toes from friction and pressure. They can be found in both weight bearing and non-weight bearing areas including between your toes, and on the tops and sides of your toes.

According to the Mayo Clinic, common signs and symptoms of a corn include:

  • A thick, rough area of skin
  • A hardened, raised bump
  • Tenderness or pain under the skin

Since corns are caused by friction and pressure, you can do a lot to prevent corn development. Remember to:

  • Wear shoes with plenty of room for your toes
  • Use padding or bandages in your shoes
  • Soak your feet in warm water to soften corns
  • After soaking, rub the corn with a pumice stone to remove hardened skin
  • Moisturize your feet every day to keep your skin soft

If you have diabetes and you develop a corn or other foot problem, you need the help of an expert, your podiatrist. Self-treating foot issues when you are diabetic can lead to injuries that don’t heal and could get worse, resulting in a serious infection.

Fortunately, your podiatrist can recommend several treatment options to get rid of corns, including:

  • Trimming away excess skin to reduce friction
  • Corn-removing medication containing salicylic acid
  • Custom-fit inserts or orthotics
  • Surgery if the corn is caused from friction due to poor bone alignment

You don’t have to deal with painful corns by yourself. Get some relief from the pain by visiting your podiatrist. Your feet are important, so seek out the best care possible to protect your feet.

By David T. Magnesen, DPM
July 05, 2018
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Hammertoes  

When most people think about foot deformities they most often think about bunions; however, hammertoes are just as common. This unassuming deformity comes about gradually, so you may not even notice it until it’s too late. “What is a hammertoe?” You might be wondering. A hammertoe affects the middle joint of a toe (often the smaller toes), causing the toe to bend downward. In severe cases, a hammertoe will look almost claw-like.

There are two kinds of hammertoes: flexible and rigid. As you might imagine, a flexible hammertoe is one in which you can still straighten the toe out. If you aren’t able to straighten the affected toe then this is a rigid hammertoe. A flexible hammertoe isn’t as serious as a rigid one; however, it’s important that you take care of your hammertoe to make sure that it doesn’t get worse.

While there is no way to cure a hammertoe there are simple measures you can take to prevent it from progressing. First and foremost, you need to take a look at the shoes you are wearing and make sure that they aren’t too tight. When you slip your feet into your shoes, does it cause your toes to bunch up against one another? If so then this could make your hammertoe worse.

Instead, opt for shoes with an ample toe box, which will allow your toes to wiggle and move around freely. If you have a structural imbalance within the foot this can leave you prone to foot problems such as hammertoes and bunions. To correct this imbalance, talk to your foot doctor about getting custom orthotics (shoe inserts), which can be placed into your shoes to help provide cushioning, support, and shock absorption for your feet.

If pain or stiffness does rear its ugly head you can choose to take an over-the-counter pain reliever like ibuprofen, which can tackle both pain and inflammation in one fell swoop, or you can place a towel-wrapped ice pack (never put ice directly on the skin, as it can cause severe burns) over the area for several minutes.

Just as you can buy pads to cover a bunion or callus, you can also buy a non-medicated protective pad to cover over a hammertoe. Since the deformed toe joint juts out this can leave the toe prone to calluses, which can cause pain when wearing shoes. To prevent a callus from forming, you can apply a protective pad over the deformed toe joint before putting on shoes.

Of course, if you are dealing with significant or frequent pain, or if the hammertoe is rigid, then you will want to turn to a podiatric specialist. In severe cases, surgery may be recommended to correct the disfigured joint.

By David T. Magnesen, DPM
February 13, 2018
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Lisfranc Fracture  

Any fracture to the foot or ankle should be taken seriously, but a Lisfranc fracture is particularly concerning for podiatrists. Because the fracture happens at the center of the foot where there are many connections, without prompt treatment this problem can significantly reduce your ability to walk or participate in athletic activities. The worse the fracture gets, the harder it is to treat. Learn more about Lisfranc fractures to see if this might be the foot problem you're experiencing.

What Is a Lisfranc Fracture?
When the bones at the center of the foot become fractured, broken or shift out of place it is called a Lisfranc injury. The ligaments that hold the bones together and cartilage at joints can also tear. This can happen when a heavy object falls on the foot, the patient has a bad fall or the foot twists unnaturally. Athletes, like soccer and football players, may be at risk for Lisfranc fractures. 

Why It’s a Concern
A Lisfranc fracture is a major concern for podiatrists because if it is allowed to go untreated for an extended period of time it can lead to a disability of the foot. It often causes the bottom of the foot to swell, bruise and become darkly discolored (a telltale sign of a Lisfranc fracture). It can also be a very painful condition that is difficult to ignore.

Lisfranc Fracture Treatments
Your foot doctor will take X-rays to confirm that you have a Lisfranc injury. If so, conservative treatments may be implemented first, including wearing a removable cast or an orthotic device that will train your bones and joints into a position for healing. In a severe case where there’s a clear fracture or severe subluxation of the bones, you may have to have foot surgery. Two common surgical solutions are fusion (healing the bones together) and internal fixation (involves the use of screws and other devices to repair the foot).

Talk to a Podiatrist
The earlier you seek treatment for a Lisfranc fracture, the better for your long-term foot health. Your podiatrist will discuss your options and come up with an ideal plan for fixing the problem. Call a foot doctor today to schedule an exam and get an official diagnosis.

By David T. Magnesen, DPM
January 16, 2018
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Sesamoid Injuries  

Everything You Need to Know About Sesamoid Injuries

 


Think you have a sesamoid injury? Sesamoids are bones embedded in tendons. Sesamoid injuries are often associated with activities requiring increased pressure on the foot, such as tennis, basketball, running, and football. Podiatrists diagnose and treat various foot problems, including sesamoid injuries. Here's everything you've ever wanted to know about sesamoid injuries.

Types of Sesamoid Injuries

Sesamoid injuries can involve the bones, tendons, and surrounding tissue in the joint. Sesamoiditis is an injury involving inflammation of the sesamoid bones and tendons. A sesamoid fracture is an acute or chronic fracture in the sesamoid bone. Turf toe is an injury to the soft tissue surrounding the big toe joint. 

Sesamoid Injury Causes

Sesamoid injuries can be caused by landing too hard on the foot after a fall or jump. Cracks in the sesamoid bones can be caused by wear and tear on the foot over time. People with high arches are at risk for developing sesamoid injuries. Frequently wearing high heels can also be a contributing factor. 

Sesamoid Injury Symptoms

The most common symptom of a sesamoid injury is pain when you move your big toe, stand, run, jump, or walk. With a fracture, the pain will be immediate, whereas with sesamoiditis, pain may develop gradually. A sesamoid injury may be painful for weeks to months. Bruising and swelling may or may not be present.

Sesamoid Injury Diagnosis

If you think you have a sesamoid injury, see a podiatrist for proper diagnosis and treatment. Your podiatrist will ask about your symptoms, activities, and medical history and examine your foot. To diagnose your foot problem, your podiatrist may order X-rays and laboratory tests.

Sesamoid Injury Treatment

Inflammation and pain are treated with oral medications or steroid injections. A pad may be placed in your shoe to cushion the sesamoid area. Your foot may be placed in a cast and crutches may be used to take pressure off of your foot. The rehabilitation period following immobilization may include physical therapy, such as therapeutic exercises and ultrasound therapy. Your podiatrist may recommend surgery if your symptoms persist after nonsurgical treatment. 

A sesamoid injury can affect your day-to-day activities and make life frustrating and miserable. Life always offers us another chance to get back on track. It's called today. Get relief today by scheduling an appointment with a podiatrist near you. A podiatrist can provide all the relief you need, with relatively little expense or hassle.